Fast Festivals

I took a few days off in July to travel to the beautiful Byron Bay with my man for Splendour in the Grass, renowned for being one of the biggest and best musical festivals in Australia. We were welcomed with a sunny 22 degree day, a perplexingly difficult tent to put up, and a confiscated bottle of vodka. Nonetheless, we persisted through the minor setbacks as we experienced non-stop musical acts and a plethora of food trucks, with the highlights undoubtedly being Childish Gambino, Foals, SZA and the chilly billy burger. I needed to have a couple of them over the weekend.

Literally the ONLY photo taken of one of my outfits

And how could I not mention the amazing fashion at Splendour? The opportunity for festival fashion almost supersedes the importance of the actual music. You could tell that people put months of thought into elaborately creating these impressive festival looks for each day of the festival. People were decked out head-to-toe in fully coordinated outfits, from their hair colour matching their shoes, to matching leopard-print boyfriend and girlfriend outfits. Dan and I missed an opportunity there.

It was wonderful to see such creativity and what is essentially art with some of these spectacular outfits. But it was a shame to think that quite a few of the clothes would have been sourced from fast-fashion brands and would be immediately discarded after the conclusion of the festival. Because realistically, you don’t walk around and see anyone typically flaunting the kind of clothes that were seen at Splendour. Furthermore, plenty of these clothes were made from environmentally-damaging materials such as sequins and synthetics, and some looked as though they would fall a part after a night spent in the mosh pit. So it is a bit of a problem that festivals are perpetuating the appeal of fast fashion when there is such a desire for inexpensive (and, often outrageous but fabulous) clothing at these events that can be used as once-offs. And since we have just passed Earth Overshoot Day on 29 July (being the date that humanity’s demand for earth’s resources exceeded what the earth can regenerate in a year), the need to curb our consumption of fast fashion has never been more urgent.

Rather than eliminating the show of fantastic fashion entirely, op shopping would be a more sustainable option for festival-goers who are looking to create unique and insta-worthy looks (because we can’t deny that part of the motivation to dress up is for the ‘gram). Alternatively, if you rummage through the wardrobes of your friends or family, you may find something super exciting like your dad’s lairy shirt from the 80’s. If this doesn’t satisfy your desire for something fabulous, then scope out businesses that provide outfit rental services and do some renting for the weekend, on the proviso that the clothes don’t undergo any damage, that is.

Ultimately, festival style doesn’t need to be purchased brand-new and festival-goers should refrain from doing so if the intention is to wear it for once and then to discard it once its purpose has been fulfilled. My pledge meant that I had to choose from what was already in my wardrobe, and my probably unnecessary concern for getting my clothes ruined did slightly inhibit my outfit choices. But it was pretty easy to find a few things to wear when I did some mix and matching. It just challenged me to be a bit more creative.

Thanks for stopping by! x

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What Does My Dress Really Cost?

Just as I thought that I would have to pack away my summer dresses for good, the Easter break brought along some beautiful weather. For a Good Friday lunch, I brought out this multi-layered dress from Tree of Life that I purchased at the end of 2018 for a bargain and absolutely adore wearing. There’s just so much going on with the paisley print, the inconspicuous sequins that are dotted all over the fabric, and the pretty under layer that peeks out from the paisley. This dress can also be worn as a long skirt, which I have been matching with a white cotton t-shirt or bandeau top and some nude sandals. I think I’ll keep it in my winter wardrobe for some multi-seasonal use, because I have a feeling that it might look alright as a skirt with some boots and a leather jacket.

 

Dress: Tree of Life

Bag: Markets in Italy

Tree of Life was given a grade C ethical rating in the 2019 Baptist World Aid Ethical Fashion Guide, which isn’t terrible, but there’s certainly room for improvement. This is particularly important in the face of the climate disaster we are facing, where the fashion industry is one of the most polluting industries due to its excessive use of resources. And unless the fast fashion movement is halted, the fashion industry will continue to jeopardise the state of our climate.

This week is Fashion Revolution Week, which aims to highlight the social justice issues that are rife in the industry as well as the environmental consequences that are posed. Fashion Revolution Week is urging people to post on social media a photo of themselves in their clothes with the hashtag #whomademyclothes, directed at the brands they are wearing to encourage transparency in the supply chain. Maybe I’ll ask Tree of Life, or maybe I’ll ask some of the other brands that I love to wear. Either way, it’s important as consumers to recognise the power we hold and to use it to demand the production of clothing that doesn’t cost the earth or the rights of garment workers. And next time I love a dress like the one above, I first and foremost need to consider where it came from and what it’s made from before I hand my cash over.

Thanks for stopping by! x

Blue Velvet

An understated but utterly elegant outfit can be comprised of a pretty skirt and a plain t-shirt. Toss in some slides or boots plus a pair of killer earrings and that’s an outfit sorted – especially when that skirt is in teal and velvet. Readers of this blog are bound to know that I have an endless love affair with teal, which was why I ended up convincing myself to buy this Michael Kors skirt at a bargain sale price. It’s swishy, long and remarkably light, making it perfect to wear in winter with boots or slides and mules in summer.

I wore it for the first time with my Balmain x H&M t-shirt and a black belt I have had lying in my closet for years that I’m pretty sure previously belonged to my mum. Big belts are officially back, and look fabulous with long skirts or wide-leg pants. Op shops usually have a great selection of belts, so if your wardrobe lacks this accessory of the season, then don’t bother heading to buy new and consider your local op shop.

Finally, I finished off the outfit with my plastic mules from Midas and a silver bag from Nine West. Silver and teal are a match made in my personal heaven.

Skirt: Michael Kors

Top: Balmain x H&M

Bag: Nine West

Shoes: Midas

This skirt is definitely my favourite purchase in a while. I just want to wear it all the time! It will also be my last purchase in a long time, because I have pledged to avoid buying fashion in 2019. After realising the destructive impact of fashion on our globe (and particularly fast-fashion), combined with the overwhelming feeling I experience when I peer into my wardrobe filled with stuff, I decided that I need to to take action on a personal level. I was inspired by Claire Goldsworthy from The Fashion Advocate (her story can be found here) who did not buy a single thing in 2018. This is going to be a challenge, as even op shops are a no-go. However, I truly believe that I have everything I need within my wardrobe and I certainly don’t need to add to my already burgeoning collection of belongings. Maybe I’ll even rediscover a few things I forgot about, and it will surely challenge my creative styling abilities! I plan on updating my progress (well, lack of purchases) on this blog, so look out for any frustrated or erratic ramblings (hopefully that is only a joke).

Thanks for stopping by! I would love to hear what you think of my ambitious plan in the comments below! x

The Beach & the Boots

Ever since pouring over 2018 street style from the various fashion weeks, I noticed a specific trend: white boots. Why? Simply because they look great with anything and everything. They are possibly even more versatile than the black boot, if that’s even possible. Instantly I knew I wanted a pair in my life so I could trapeze around in white boots all day/everyday, just like those fabulous bloggers and fashion editors that would don the same pair with a different outfit all through fashion week. I did some exploring as you do, and found a pointy-toed pair from Midas that was well within my budget. These are going to last me all through the year AND they are fabulous enough to prevent me from desiring any more boots, as I have made a pact with myself to STOP BUYING FASHION because a) the environment, and b) I have so much stuff already (and who really needs that much stuff?).

I knew the boots would look effortless with a summer dress, so this week I wore them with a midnight green dress from Dissh, a white Furla wallet and some drop earrings from Witchery. Clearly they are not going to be my go-to shoe as the temperature creeps up to the blazing 40s, but I love the way they contrast against the green and make the outfit ‘pop’. Such popping good fun.

Dress: Dissh 

Shoes: Midas

Wallet: Furla

Earrings: Witchery 

Thanks for stopping by! Check me out on Instagram @ilikeyourshirt_blog (in my popping white boots)!

Black Derby

It was Derby Day the other weekend, the black & white themed event of the Melbourne Spring Racing Carnival which is arguably the easiest theme to adhere to. So I sifted through my wardrobe, full well knowing that it already contained plenty of options, and I quickly I found ‘the outfit’. The top was actually found in an op shop years ago when my sister was hunting for costumes for an amateur production of ‘Rent’ about 8 years ago, and the skirt was was a special find in a boutique in the Gold Coast. After years of my mum fashionably attending the races, we have amassed a collection of hats and fascinators. So I simply plucked this black hat from the collection, and was all set with a sparkly black Mimco bag and my Topshop mules. My wardrobe is absolutely bursting with clothes collected through the years, so I know that whatever I need will always be in there – even if it requires a twist of creativity.

Racing fashion has progressively become more playful and broad, with headbands, crowns, fashion turbans and headscarves all being applicable racing headwear. Pantsuits and blazer dresses in an assortment of colours have been all over the track this season, with a spot of androgynous dressing being sported by plenty of women making a contrast with the traditional racing styles. I regret not taking photos of some of the unique outfits I noticed during the day – there was so much creativity on show and some really extraordinary looks.

Top: Op shop

Skirt: White Closet

Shoes: Topshop

Hat: Vintage

Bag: Mimco

I wish we didn’t need an excuse to don racing fashion – it’s so much fun to play around with the headwear! x

Racing Mad

When cold days still reign in October and November in Melbourne, the perfect races option for those who can’t handle the cold is a jumpsuit. As women’s fashion is generally becoming more androgynous, two-piece suits and jumpsuits for women are being seen all over the racing fields. The name “jumpsuits” were literally given to the one-piece suits worn by parachute jumpers, and then eventually in the 1930’s it evolved into a fashion piece initially crafted by Elsa Schiaparelli. Since then, jumpsuits experienced their heyday in the 1980s complete with shoulder pads and plenty of colour and sequins. Although most of us don’t exactly care to repeat the trends from the 80s, this trend is only getting stronger, as jumpsuits are still being sent down every major runway to this day.

A part from the inconvenience of getting out of one for the purposes of going to the bathroom, this jumpsuit from Forever New was perfect for the cool, windy day that I attended for the Caulfield Cup. Fortunately I wore a fascinator that was stuck to my head so couldn’t fly off from the wind, and comfortable block-heeled mules from Topshop. To inject some colour into the outfit, I wore my sparkly aquamarine Mimco bag with matching blue earrings. Unless it’s Derby Day, additional colour should usually be included to support an entirely black outfit, even if it’s just a spot of red lipstick. There’s so many beautiful colours to choose from, so why just settle for one?

 

 

 

 

Jumpsuit: Forever New

Bag: Mimco

Shoes: Topshop

Headpiece: Morgan and Taylor

Earrings: Mimco 

Thanks for popping by! x

This Old Pair of Jeans

I have had these jeans since I was 13. I remember purchasing them clearly from Just Jeans, because moments later I lost my beloved Guess wallet and I was in tears for the remainder of the day. Losing a wallet sucks, but at least I had spent the $100 of cash I had in there for these jeans, and $100 for a mere 13 year old was A LOT of money. But the passing years have demonstrated how you can’t beat investing in good quality pieces that will last you forever, and fortunately I didn’t do any growing since I bought these jeans.

My wardrobe is literally an accumulation of pieces I have collected for the last 10 years. Early on, my mum instilled in me the need to purchase timeless and quality pieces that I could use for years to come. Not only has this taught me how to be an economical and sustainable shopper, but it has led me to appreciate my wardrobe and force me to use plenty of creativity. Styles are always repeating themselves, which makes it easy to use some of my older clothes and accessories (who knew cummerbunds were back in fashion?!). Certain items can always be updated by pairing them with newer styles, so I’m almost never exasperatedly heading to the shops to buy a new outfit for an occasion. Whatever I need can be found in my wardrobe – and that’s a challenge I never get sick of! That’s not to say that I don’t shop around, and I’m not going to pretend that my wardrobe isn’t overflowing. It definitely is and I probably need a wardrobe the size of the one Big made for Carrie in order to store all my stuff. But hardly anything in my wardrobe becomes obsolete unless it’s of terrible quality – and I made the decision a long time ago to try and avoid shopping at cheap fast fashion brands.

Only time will tell the of the true investment value of good-quality pieces, but you can definitely be assured that it will show as the seasons pass. I’ve paired these jeans with a classic trench coat from Witchery and some Prada lace-ups that I found at the designer outlets in Florence for an absolute steal. Already heavily discounted, there was an additional 20% and the shoes ended up being substantially cheaper than some non-designer leather sandals that I purchased a month later. How satisfying are designer bargains?? It would be nice to come across them more often.

Jeans: Just Jeans

Trench: Witchery

Jumper: Country Road

Shoes: Prada

Bag: Decjuba 

Sunglasses: Chloe 

Thanks for stopping by! x