Vintage Party

Last year, my aunty generously donated to me a heap of her old clothes. The treasure-filled bag contained silky materials, some sequins and plenty of shoulder pads- a homage to their 80s roots. Most of these clothes were specifically made for her, and in particular she adored this peach A-line dress. 

You can immediately acknowledge the power of well-made clothes by the way they sit on your frame. This dress falls naturally over the waist and gathers into natural pleats in the skirt, forming a flattering silhouette supported by the gorgeous lace that really gives the dress a vintage vibe. To me, it just seems like the ultimate vintage party dress. You can imagine twirling around with the skirt following suit to some jazzy music.

I paired it with Nine West nude court shoes (they are killers to wear, but aren’t they so pretty?) and a pearl embellished clutch. Funnily enough, the jewellery is all vintage with a bracelet I picked up in an op shop and earrings that used to belong to my grandmother.

I am so grateful to have had this opportunity to wear this beautiful dress. My Aunty Mary sure has style. x

Advertisements

A 20s Soiree

A fabulous exhibition called ‘Night Life’ is on display at Rippon Lea Estate in Melbourne, featuring original fashion items from the 20s and 30s that were made and worn in Australia. The ‘roaring 20s’ manifested a time of economic prosperity and joy due to the conclusion of the War. Skirt lengths and hairstyles were shorter, and sequins and fine embellishments were all the rage. Although there was reluctance to adopt these new controversial styles that brought fashion into a less conservative era, they soon became accepted in the western world by the mid 20s. Even in the present day, the 20s are known to have produced some of the most desirable and chic fashion of the 20th century.

Elaborately detailed wraps and capes rose to popularity in the 1920s, as can be seen in the above picture where the sheer cape decorates this plain black maxi dress.

This dress exemplifies the look of the 20s with a dropped waist, skirt measured just below the knees, and fine embroidery with sequins.

Floral prints became popular in the 1930s, and obviously this trend was repeated in the 1970s. These historical fashion exhibitions present how trends will always repeat themselves, and how in our own lifetimes, we are bound to experience the same trends a few times over. Nevertheless, style will always be in fashion, and fashion these days is so broad that it is constantly integrating trends from different eras into single outfits. This is also demonstrated by the contemporary Melbourne-based stylists and photographers who have featured their work in this exhibition.

This collection of stunning clothes and accessories made me wonder about the fabulous and fashionable women who wore them. I would have loved to know the stories behind these outfits, and the exciting shenanigans that were performed in them!

Tassels, tassels, and more tassels. These vintage bags were hand beaded with gold clasps and exclusively worn for formal events.

As hemlines became shorter, shoes became an important feature of an outfit as they were constantly on display. These shoes appeared very small and narrow, almost meant for a modern-day child.

How I wish I could be transported into the 1920s for just one night to enjoy a sophisticated society party. If you are in Melbourne, I would highly recommend visiting this lovely exhibition that is open until 30 July.

Follow me on Instagram @ilikeyourshirt_blog for more fashion snaps and musings. Thanks for visiting! x

To the 1950’s and Back

Dungatar is the fictional rural Australian town where the Dressmaker movie is set.

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, I visited the delightful Dressmaker costume exhibition at Rippon Lea estate and the requirement was to dress in 1950’s get-up. I looked to my history of fashion books for inspiration on the design classics of the 50’s, and naturally had a bit of help from Google. The fashions were classy, accentuated a petite waist and typically involved bags that matched with hats. Fur was a necessity in the winter time, and hair was of utmost importance. I wouldn’t mind travelling back into the 1950’s for fashion purposes, as I love the elegance and femininity that it exuded. There’s a hypnotic power that is conveyed from some of the 1950’s fashion photographs, as the women pictured appear untouchable and formidable with their armour of graceful clothing. The dramatic effect of the black and white filter definitely enhanced that.

I dug deep into my wardrobe and produced a blue mint A-line skirt from Forever New, a vintage lace top from a market and a shapeless winter coat from Asos. My accessories had to be matched with my crutches, so I chose metallic silver for my bag and sparkly loafers.

I stumbled on this issue of hair. I overreached and hit 1960’s territory with this Jacquie Kennedy inspired hairdo. There wasn’t much time to get the curlers out so I let my hair do what it did once I blowdried it, which happened to be flicking up at the ends.

Everyone abided by the dress code and it was so wonderful to see the effort each person had exerted to look as though they had jumped out of a 1950’s film. Women had borrowed their grandmas’ fur stoles, home-made dresses were worn and some must have spent the afternoon wearing hair rollers. Complete with champagne and dancing, it was a fantastic evening of going back in time.

Coat: Asos

Top: Vintage

Skirt: Forever New 

Shoes: Aldo 

Bag: Nine West 

Want to see more of my personal style and fashion musings? Follow me here and on Instagram @ilikeyourshirt_blog ! x

Autumn Leaves & Lace

My affinity for white lace has reached its peak in this long-sleeved Sportsgirl dress. I love the conservative sleeves and dress length which gives it a feminine vintage look, and I paired it with my oxblood-coloured satchel and burgundy lips to maximise on the vintage style. There is nothing that signifies the first signs of autumn and winter like dark red lippy with hues of purple. It compliments the grey skies and resembles autumn leaves, and is often worn with white because it contrasts so beautifully. Also, dark red is essentially a winter colour because it is the same colour as wine, and wine is drunk in winter. There you go.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In order to slightly modernise the look, I wore lace-up gladiator sandals.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dress: Sportsgirl

Satchel: The Leather Satchel Co.

Sandals: Lipstik

Want to see more of my personal style and fashion musings? Follow my Instagram @ilikeyourshirt_blog ! x

Sunshine on a Rainy Day

Well, judging by the bright hues of green plastering braches and nature strips, spring is well in force but is taking its time to bring the increasing warmth with it. No matter though, in the rare glimpses of summer I tossed off my jeans and let my legs breathe. Ahhh, the unfamiliar yet refreshing feel of a warm breeze. I’m even sporting florals to express my spring jubilation.

The top is actually a playsuit. My growth spurt has forced me to stop wearing it in its natural form due to the over-exposure of, um, flesh.

Playsuit – Forever New

Skirt – Target

Belt- Cotton On

Shoes – Lipstick

Bag – Vintage

Leather in the Fields

Leather for winter is like being offered free money: always welcome. And especially this year with a massive revival of the silver-studded biker jackets from a couple of years ago and the clunky leather boots, leather (real or fake) is always on trend for winter one way or another. However I chose to downgrade the edgy, lethal look black leather usually provides by pairing it up with a relatively dainty dress that is often too delicate in appearance to wear on its own. Incorporating my vintage leather jacket balances out the wildly feminine look and also makes the dress wearable in winter, which is a bonus.

Leather jacket- Vintage

Dress- Sportsgirl

Shoes- Lipstik Shoes

Bag- Vintage

Belt- ?  

Spots and Socks

It was suspiciously not bone-cold chilly the other day which granted me the luxury of deciding not to don a coat outdoors. This was exciting because I don’t own a coat that compliments the dress to my liking, so a single layer could suffice in the pleasant temperature. I bought the dress yonks ago from a small market and thankfully leopard print in public continues to be acceptable, and although I’m not entirely convinced that the kinky print can be pulled off as a beacon of sophistication, I am completely sold on this dress.

The over-the-knee socks worked well in the weather and to liven up the outfit I adopted a vintage bag that I discovered during my annual exploration through my mother’s wardrobe. She may have owned some timeless pieces, but there was plenty of rubbish among the gems that she is convinced will come back in style ‘sometime soon’. I don’t have the heart to tell her that it’s 20 years past the time.

Dress- Sweetaeacia

Bag- Vintage

Shoes- Nine West

Socks- DIY made